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Media Release from BROUK “I THOUGHT I WOULD DIE” Physical evidence of atrocities against the Rohingya. Release on Wednesday 1st November 2017.

Media Release from Burmese Rohingya Organisation UK

Wednesday 1st November 2017

 

‘I Thought I Would Die’ – New Report Details Eyewitness Accounts of Atrocities – Burmese Rohingya Organisation UK

 

The Rohingya are currently being targeted by the fourth wave of ethnic cleansing against them in the past five years.

This new report, ‘I Thought I Would Die’ presents evidence of violations of international law being perpetrated against the Rohingya, including attacks on children, indiscriminate use of landmines, random firing on fleeing villagers and the use of rape.  These accounts add to a growing body of evidence which points the finger squarely at the Myanmar security forces.

The sheer frequency and acuity of this kind of abuse against the Rohingya, committed against the backdrop of chronic and decades-old state persecution, point to an ongoing strategy of “systemic weakening” of the ethnic Rohingya community as a whole, which has been argued to be a precursor stage to full-blown genocide.

Since the latest bout of violence against Myanmar’s ethnic Rohingya minority erupted into life on 25th August 2017, the government and military wings of Myanmar’s hybrid government have fallen back on tried and tested narratives of denial. This report provides evidence to prove that the government and military are lying about the current situation.

The report also proposes practical steps the government of Myanmar and the international community should take to stop the violence and address the root causes.

“The evidence of violations of international law against the Rohingya is overwhelming, now we need to see action to hold those responsible to account and end the policies of repression,” said Tun Khin, President of the Burmese Rohingya Organisation UK. “The government and military have been lying to the people of Myanmar and the international community, but they can’t hide from the truth forever.”

 

For more information, contact Tun Khin on +44(0)7888714866 OR +1 646 945 9982

The report is available at http://brouk.org.uk/BROUK Report (NOV-2017) “I THOUGHT I WOULD DIE” Physical evidence of atrocities against the Rohingya.

“I THOUGHT I WOULD DIE” Physical evidence of atrocities against the Rohingya, BROUK Report (Nov-2017).

 

Report Nov-2017

 

“I THOUGHT I WOULD DIE”

Physical evidence of atrocities against the Rohingya

 

This report is based on more than a dozen interviews conducted in the Cox’s Bazar region of Bangladesh with Rohingya refugees who had arrived from Myanmar since attacks on August 25th. BROUK interviewed six child victims, four rape survivors/victims, a man who was injured by a landmine and two adult civilians who were shot while fleeing their villages. Aall of the cases had been assessed as credible through consultation with officials from NGOs operating in the refugee camps in the area.

As was the case in previous documentation conducted by BROUK in Bangladesh, evidence of gunshot and other weapon wounds were checked against information collected by international NGOs working in the refugee camps, who wish to remain anonymous. Our photographic, video and testimonial evidence was shared with them and with rights experts, from organisations that wish to remain anonymous, for peer review.

Interviewees were consulted through a network supervised by the head of Burmese Rohingya Organisation of the United Kingdom (BROUK), U Tun Khin, in Bangladesh; all were asked a series of questions designed to elicit data according to best practices. The material was translated independently and double-checked by Rohingya speakers.

Analysis of gunshot wounds was sought from either a medical doctor who was not paid for her opinions or checked against available data provided by NGOs who treated victims.

Interviews were conducted in the Kutupalong and Nayapura camps in Cox’s Bazar region of Bangladesh; discussions mostly took place indoors within a space that would allow for maximum privacy and frankness.

Click on the below link to download the full BROUK Report (NOV-2017) “I THOUGHT I WOULD DIE” Physical evidence of atrocities against the Rohingya, in PDF format:

http://brouk.org.uk/BROUK Report (NOV-2017) “I THOUGHT I WOULD DIE” Physical evidence of atrocities against the Rohingya.pdf

 

 

 

CNN interview with BROUK President Tun Khin on Current Issues & ongoing Genocide of Rohingya in the Arakan State of Myanmar, 9th September 2017.

CNN interview with BROUK President Tun Khin on Current Issues & ongoing Genocide of Rohingya in the Arakan State of Myanmar, 9th September 2017.

In the interview, Tun Khin highlighted the mass killings of Rohingyas by Myanmar military and BGP. He further said, the government troops are not even sparing small children, they Burning the houses and forcing the villagers to flee.

“We are seeing the final stages of genocide against the Rohingya minority. Women have been raped, children’s are been thrown into the fire, Rohingya houses have been burnt down. This is what is happening in there now” Said Tun Khin.

 

 

 

 

“Rohingya Muslims facing world’s most enduring sentiment: bigotry” Tun Khin President BROUK in an interview with “CBCnews” on 8th September 2017.

By Nahlah Ayed, CBC News 

Posted: Sep 08, 2017

“Rohingya Muslims facing world’s most enduring sentiment: bigotry” Tun Khin President BROUK in an interview with “CBCnews” on 8th September 2017.

CBC News

A Rohingya refugee girl stands next to newly arrived refugees who fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar in Ukhiya on Sept. 6. More than 125,000 refugees have flooded across the border into Bangladesh. The government of Buddhist-majority Myanmar largely does not recognize them as citizens. (KM Asad/AFP/Getty Images)


“Discrimination doesn’t come naturally. It is taught.”

With simple, stinging words, Nobel Laureate Desmond Tutu offered a reminder of how far humans will go in the name of their differences.

His intervention — a rebuke — was an open letter to de facto Burmese leader Aung San Suu Kyi, condemning her refusal to call out the horror endured by the minority Rohingya Muslims in her country.

But within was also an indictment of the world’s muted reaction to the violence against, and extraordinary displacement of, thousands of people who are already labelled the most persecuted minority in the world.

“We know that you know that human beings may look and worship differently — and some may have greater firepower than others,” he writes.

“But none are superior and none inferior … when you scratch the surface we are all the same.”

Nobel laureate Desmond Tutu: 'When you scratch the surface we are all the same.' (The Associated Press)

Nobel laureate Desmond Tutu: ‘When you scratch the surface we are all the same.’ (The Associated Press)

But to be Rohingya in 2017 is to be the other. It is to face that most enduring and insidious human sentiment: bigotry.

And they are facing it not only in Myanmar, where bigotry is at the root of their longtime effective quarantine, but also from the wider world, where prejudice has long manifested itself as indifference.

“We are friendless in our own country: because we are racially different, we are religiously different and our appearance is different,” says Tun Khin, a U.K.-based Rohingya Muslim activist whose family fled an earlier wave of violence to Bangladesh. He is president of Burmese Rohingya Organization UK.

“We are witnessing the most horrific situation in our history.”

This Aug. 30, 2017 photo shows Rohingya refugees reach for food aid at Kutupalong refugee camp in Ukhiya near the Bangladesh-Myanmar border on Aug. 30. (AFP/Getty Images

This Aug. 30, 2017 photo shows Rohingya refugees reach for food aid at Kutupalong refugee camp in Ukhiya near the Bangladesh-Myanmar border on Aug. 30. (AFP/Getty Images


Long before the latest violence sent 270,000 Rohingyas pouring across the border to Bangladesh, fleeing for their lives, they lived a bleak existence.

Once afforded rights as an ethnic minority among a majority Buddhist population—Khin says Burma once even had a radio station in Rohingya language, and his grandfather served as a parliamentary secretary—things changed following a 1962 military coup.

Since then, their rights have gradually been removed. They have been segregated in the Rakhine state and denied education and freedom of movement.

Though many have been in Burma for generations, they are considered illegals and were effectively stripped of the right to citizenship in 1982. Hundreds of thousands who fled earlier violence haven’t come back.

Rohingya refugees at a crowded camp in 2012 on the outskirts of Sittwe, Myanmar. The UN calls them one of the most persecuted minorities in the world. (Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

Rohingya refugees at a crowded camp in 2012 on the outskirts of Sittwe, Myanmar. The UN calls them one of the most persecuted minorities in the world. (Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)


“There’s no safety and security… you are living like a hell. [An] open prison.”

And none of this is new. As a persecuted people, they have long been neglected by the world, even when it championed the cause of democracy in Burma.

When elections finally happened in 2015, Rohingya were not allowed to vote. Still they hoped their lot might improve when Aung San Suu Kyi, an opposition activist who was put under house arrest by the military, became the state counsellor.

Khin, who campaigned for her release back then, is bitterly disappointed.

When she was under house arrest, “she mentioned that, ‘please use your liberty to promote ours.’ Now I want to ask Aung San Suu Kyi: Please use your liberty to promote ours.”


Feels well planned

The Myanmar military undertook the current “clearance operations” after Rohingya militants attacked government forces on Aug. 25, killing and injuring many of them.

Rohingya Muslims say they condemn the violence, but the military’s response amounts to collective punishment. Bolstered by Buddhist nationalists, the violence, to the Rohingya, has the feel of being well planned. They believe it is a continuation of a sustained campaign to wipe them out.

Khin calls it ethnic cleansing, a slow genocide.

During earlier flareups, Suu Kyi said ethnic cleansing was “too strong” a term.

myanmar-election-suu-kyi

Aung San Suu Kyi doesn’t have the power to halt military operations, but many of her supporters, including Desmond Tutu, insist she has the moral standing and obligation to do so. (Jorge Silva/Reuters)


This time around, she’s quoted as saying there was a “huge iceberg of misinformation” surrounding the crisis, but that “we have to take care of everybody who is in our country whether or not they are citizen — it is our duty, and we try our best.”

Suu Kyi doesn’t have the power to order a halt to the military’s operations.

But many of her supporters, including Tutu, have insisted she has the moral standing—and obligation—to do so.

They also insist this isn’t a legal or immigration question. It is a human rights question, a dangerous case of mass discrimination, prejudice, racism and ultimately, hate.

“She was the one person in the country who really could have challenged this really ingrained and endemic prejudice against Muslims in the country and Rohingya in particular,” Mark Farmaner, of Burma Campaign UK, told CBC News.

Get to root causes

Her government has kept in place all the policies of the previous military regime, he added. They use “the combination of human rights violations, and deliberate impoverishment, to force Rohingyas to leave.”

This week, UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres advised getting to the root causes to solve the crisis.

“It will be crucial to give the Muslims of Rakhine state either nationality or, at least for now, a legal status that will allow them to have a normal life—including freedom of movement and access to labour markets, education and health services.”

A Rohingya refugee from Myanmar's Rakhine state holds a baby as she sits in a makeshift shelter after arriving at the Kutupalong refugee camp near the Bangladeshi town of Teknaf on Sept. 5. (KM Asad/AFP/Getty Images)

A Rohingya refugee from Myanmar’s Rakhine state holds a baby as she sits in a makeshift shelter after arriving at the Kutupalong refugee camp near the Bangladeshi town of Teknaf on Sept. 5. (KM Asad/AFP/Getty Images)


But to the hellish turn of events in the past weeks, world leaders have so far only offered couched words.

Many have only this week expressed concern—or any hint of support for Bangladesh, an already impoverished country that must contend with a huge added responsibility.

World powers continue to support a leader who appears to be maintaining her position at a cost that Tutu described as “surely too steep.”

Khin says some of those countries help train and equip the Myanmar military and can send a powerful message by suspending that support.

Peacekeepers must be sent in, he added. Suspended aid in Rakhine state must be restored. Willing media should be allowed to monitor.

“It’s not a time to condemn by releasing statements and mentioning their concern,” said Khin. “It is time to act.”

 

Click on the below link to read the interview on CBCnews web portal.

“Rohingya Muslims facing world’s most enduring sentiment: bigotry” Tun Khin President BROUK in an interview with “CBCnews” on 8th September 2017.

Tun Khin President BROUK in an interview with “FRANCE 24” on 31st Aug 2017 about current Rohingya Genocide in Rakhine region and Myanmar Unrest.

“BURMA UNREST” Mr Tun Khin President BROUK on Chanel France 24 discusses the ruthless situation of Rohingyas in inside the Rakhine State. The mass killing of Rohingyas by Myanmar military and BGP, Burning the houses and forcing the villagers to flee.

According to sources,Two dozen bodies recovered on Bangladeshi Beaches.

Tun Khin President BROUK in a discussion panel in Inside Story – Al JAZEERA English on “Why are Rohingya refugees stranded in no-man’s land?” on 31st Aug 2017.

BROUK

Inside Story – Why are Rohingya refugees stranded in no-man’s land?

It is a humanitarian crisis that is growing all the time, Said Tun Khin.

A week after former UN chief Kofi Annan released a report with recommendations to end years of persecution of the Rohingya people, the situation in Rakhine state in Myanmar appears to be getting worse. 

Women and children are among the tens of thousands of the ethnic Muslim-minority Rohingya community trying to get across the border into Bangladesh. But Bangladesh doesn’t want them. Security is being tightened, and many people are being turned away, and are stuck in no-man’s land.

The refugees tell of attacks by the Myanmar military, of Rohingya villagers being killed and their homes set on fire. But the Myanmar army says it’s launched a security crackdown on a rebel group after coming under attack itself. 

The biggest obstacle to peace is Myanmar citizenship. The commission led by Annan says all restrictions on Rohingya should be lifted and describes them as the biggest single stateless community in the world.

But is the international community listening, and will it do anything about it?

AJ Inside story

Tun Khin President BROUK talks to The Newsmakers in “TRT World” on 30th Aug 2017 about “Rohingya persecution in Myanmar”.

“We are seeing the final stages of genocide against the Rohingya minority.” Said Tun Khin.

Human rights activist Tun Khin talks to The Newsmakers on recent accusations that Myanmar soldiers are committing extrajudicial killings of civilians.

 

DEMONSTRATION ON ROHINGYA GENOCIDE IN ARAKAN, BURMA ON WEDNESDAY, 30th AUGUST 2017.

DEMONSTRATION ON ROHINGYA GENOCIDE IN ARAKAN, BURMA ON WEDNESDAY, 30th AUGUST 2017.

Join us for the demonstration on Wednesday, 30th August 2017 outside Foreign & Commonwealth Office, London from 2:00 pm – 03:00 pm.

Genocide

Background:

From 25th August Myanmar army and police forces have been carrying out indiscriminate killing of Rohingya civilians, torching and wholesale destruction of their homes and villages. More than 700 Rohingyas, mostly old men, women and children were massacred, and at least 18 Rohingya villages were burned down in the townships of Maungdaw, Buthidaung and Rathedaung in Rakhine State. As of Today, at least 80,000 people are internally displaced causing a great humanitarian disaster. Due to curfew order, blockade and extensive destruction of foodstuff and essentials, there is an acute shortage of food, medicine, and other necessities. The situation is exponentially worsening.

The Rohingya Community in the UK is holding a demonstration in front of the Foreign & Common Wealth Office of the U.K. to urge the U.K. Government to put pressure on the Myanmar Government to stop this unprecedented campaign of terror and brutality, and to immediately discuss the issue in the UNSC.

We would like to invite you to join us and raise your voice to protect Rohingya lives in Arakan. Thank you so much.

Please show your solidarity with us …!!!

 

The demonstration will take place as follow;

Time: 14:00-15:00

Date:  30th August 2017 (Wednesday)

Place: Foreign & Commonwealth Office, King Charles Street, London, SW1A 2AH

Nearest Tube Station: Westminster (District Line and Jubilee Line)

 

For more information please contact, Tun Khin +44 7888714866.

Tun Khin President BROUK in an interview with “TRT World” on 28th Aug 2017 about current Rohingya sufferings in Rakhine region and Myanmar Tensions.

Myanmar Tensions: Tun Khin discusses the situation inside the closed off Rakhine region where Rohingyas are seriously suffering.

Myanmar security forces intensified operations against Rohingya insurgents on Monday, police and other sources said, following three days of clashes with militants in the worst violence involving Myanmar’s Muslim minority in five years.

Tun Khin President BROUK in an interview with Al JAZEERA English on 26th Aug 2017 highlighted the current situation of Rohingya and the attack against Rohingya Civilians started again from 26th August 2017.

The attack against Rohingya Civilians in Northern Arakan started again from 26th August 2017.

Rohingya victims arrived in Bangladesh claimed they witnessed mass killings by Myanmar military and BGP. The government troops are not sparing small children. Burning the houses and forcing the villagers to flee.